For Rwanda

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I have about 4 and a half hours left of the 40 hour famine. I’m quite hungry and I think the water I drank kind of made me hungrier. If that’s possible. But being so close to my goal is motivating me and even though it’s only a tiny experience of what the Rwandans go through everyday, I think that feeling of knowing you’re hungry but you can’t eat has finally hit me. I know that after 12 pm today, I will be eating like normal. But that won’t stop the thoughts, feelings and experiences doing the 4o hour famine has led me on. I’ve realised that committing to the 40 hour famine has made my want to help children like Promesse (photo above) so they can eat, they can drink clean water and then they can be able to go to school and get a good education and leave the poverty cycle that grips generations.

 

I’ve seen the beauty of these children first hand. Every time we go back to India, the distinct poverty that greets me from outside the gated communities where my relatives live shocks me. We don’t see things like that in Australia. And it makes me extraordinarily sad. I remember one Christmas in India, we went around to the local orphanage to celebrate with the children. The children I was greeted with were all so joyful and happy, not to mention intelligent. It’s a fact that money = education. You don’t have the money, you don’t have an education. And for some of the smartest children, that means never being able to complete your education because you physically can’t. And here I am, in Sydney, with a comfortable house, electronics, fresh food and water, and access to a great education at one of the best all girls schools in Sydney. But I take everything for granted. I would like to do aid work and help the children. But then it’s also a fact that the children coming to me and begging in India don’t get the money for themselves or their families. That money goes to some sleazebag who’s basically running a slave trade.

 

This injustice that resides in places like Asia and Africa, where the distinct income inequality is visible makes me so sad. And the worst thing is that sometimes we can’t even help. 

 

Food for thought.

 

xx Simi 

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